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A geometric framework for protein and cell diffusion and interaction

Protein pattern generation has been extensively explored experimentally in recent years. Proteins diffusing and interacting in cells, like birds that organize into flocks by associating solely with their close neighbors, may establish…

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Model for studying nature’s patterns.

Wings are like fingerprints for many insect species, with no two patterns being the same. These insects, like many other organisms ranging from leopards to zebrafish, benefit from nature’s seemingly limitless ability to generate a wide range of shapes and patterns. However, how do these patterns emerge? Harvard University researchers have created a model that…

Fractal patterns preferred by children under three years

Natural surroundings have fractal patterns that recur at various size scales, and they are also found in highly beautiful creative creations. By the age of three, youngsters have developed an adult-like affinity for visual fractal patterns found in nature. That discovery was made among children raised in an environment of Euclidean geometry, such as buildings…

Neurons use fractal networks for better connectivity

Many of nature’s fractal objects benefit from the favorable functionality that comes from pattern repetition at various sizes. Examples from nature include beaches, lightning, rivers, and trees, as well as cardiovascular and respiratory systems such as the bronchial tree. Neurons, like trees, are thought to represent a common kind of fractal branching activity. Although prior neuron research…

Mathematical skills improved by tri-dimensional thinking

In 2019, a nationwide study on fundamental skills in Switzerland discovered a link between children’s spatial awareness at the age of three and their mathematical ability in primary school. Other variables, such as socioeconomic position or linguistic competence, were ruled out by the researchers. It is unknown how spatial ability impacts arithmetic skills in youngsters, although…

Using hyperbolic geometry to map the olfactory space

In the natural environment, the sense of smell, or olfaction, is used to identify contaminants and assess nutritional value by utilizing the connections formed between chemicals during biological processes. As a result, the synthesis of a specific toxin by a plant or bacteria will be accompanied by the emission of specific sets of volatile chemicals,…

Geometry of the stem cell’s micro-environment can influence organ aging and susceptibility to cancer.

Stem cells are the raw materials of the body, the cells that give rise to all other cells with specific tasks. Stem cells divide to create new cells in the body or in a laboratory under the correct conditions. Referred to as daughter cells, these cells either become new stem cells (self-renewal) or specialized cells…

Plato’s cube is nature’s preferred choice for fragmentation.

Plato is widely recognized as the first to create the concept of an atom, or the idea that matter is made up of indivisible components at the smallest scale. The Greek philosopher proposed the primordial forms of the universe’s structure, arguing that the universe was made up of five different forms of matter: earth, air, fire,…

Number sense: emergence from the recognition of visible objects

Humans and animals have a “number sense,” or the capacity to intuitively estimate the numerosity of visual elements in a collection. This capacity suggests that processes for extracting numerosity are inside the brain’s visual system, which is largely concerned with visual object recognition. Researchers have long questioned if these number neurons are created in the…

Hans Jenny and the science of sound: cymatics.

This is not unregulated chaos; it is a dynamic but ordered pattern. Hans Jenny (16 August 1904, Basel – 23 June 1972) was a natural scientist and physician who coined the term cymatics to explain the acoustic impacts of sound wave phenomena. To this field have contributed a number of scholars, that believed sound plays a…

Are patterns real or imagined?

For neuroscientists studying complex systems, patterns exhibit valuable data that may or may not correspond to higher levels of cognitive processes. Tyler Millhouse proposes a criterion evaluating just how real a pattern is likely to be, improving a SFI External Professor Daniel Dennett’s 1991 explanation, which utilized ‘compressibility’ to determine how genuine a pattern is…

World’s oldest example of applied geometry revealed by Australian mathematician.

Pythagoras of Samos is credited with several of the world’s most important mathematical theories. The Pythagorean theorem, the Theory of Proportions, and the sphericity of the Earth are only a few examples of Pythagora’s bright mind. At least, that’s what we believed. As our grasp of history grows, a few gaps in these attributions become…

Sounds, shapes, speech and body movements convey emotion through one shared property

People communicate their emotions using their voice, face, and movement, as well as through abstract forms such as art, architecture, and music. The structure of these expressions is frequently intuitively related to their meaning: flowery curlicues are used in romantic poetry, while a spiky script is used in death metal band logos. A Dartmouth study published in…

Mathematical Beauty Activates Same Brain Region as Great Art or Music

The beauty of mathematical formulations resides in abstracting, in simple equations, universal truths. Many people, including mathematicians Bertrand Russell (1919) and Hermann Weyl (Dyson, 1956; Atiyah, 2002), physicist Paul Dirac (1939), and art critic Clive Bell (1914), have written about the importance of beauty in mathematical formulations and compared the experience of mathematical beauty to…

Deciphering the brain’s color and shape coding

A human can identify hundreds of thousands of unique colors and forms visually, but how does the brain process all of this information? Previously, scientists assumed that the visual system records shape and color separately with discrete groups of neurons and then integrates them much later. According to the Salk researchers, there are neurons that…

Depth and coordinates processing in neural networks

The MonoDepth model, which calculates depth from a single picture, was studied by researchers from the Technical University of Delft in the Netherlands. A single image necessitates Deep Neural Networks’ relying on visual cues, which necessitates awareness of the surroundings, a fundamentally assumption-laden process. The current focus of monocular depth estimation research has been on…